Archives

Theatrical Hair Tips

Today’s post is in response to Madelyn’s question about doing hair for a theatrical production. I’m not familiar with the specific show requested so I don’t know what types of characters you are working with. However, I have done hair for a bunch of shows. For stage production hair design, your first priority must be durability. I can hear my authenticity-focused re-enacting readers fainting for that statement, but authenticity takes second place to the hair lasting the length of the show (or at least until intermission when you can touch it up and fix things). As the actors change costumes, fragile styles will get messed up, and even the most spectacular authentic style will look awful by the end of the first act if it isn’t really secure. When in doubt, use more pins! Depending on the actress’ hair type, gel can be great for getting hair to hold a shape and stay in place. Hairspray is useful for keeping the surface of a style smooth.

For a production, it’s important to capture the look of a an era, but you don’t have to be 100% accurate. Remember, the audience is some distance from the actors, and they won’t be able to see the hair styles that clearly. They just need to be the right general shape to help everyone believe that they are in the time period. Some thoughts would be things like “During this era . . . ”

  1. Is the style worn high on the head, the back, or near the neck?
  2. Should their be fullness at the sides? The top?
  3. Which is representative of the era– center part, side part, or no part?

One other thing to consider is if the character will wear a hat any time during the show. A beautiful up-do will look ridiculous if the actress had to perch her hat on top because her style is too big.

The following style suggestions will apply most directly to shows that are set in the 1800s– anything by Dickens, Little Women, any other Louisa May Alcott books, Anne of Green Gables, Oklahoma, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, any other “pioneer” plays, Sherlock Holmes, etc.

For little girls, braids are a great choice. I would try this one https://rapunzelsresource.wordpress.com/2009/10/20/luana-braids/ or the looped up variation here https://rapunzelsresource.wordpress.com/2009/10/20/luana-loops/. If at all possible, try not to leave any hair down because it will look messy very quickly. For little girls with very short hair that you can’t braid, a bow holding back one side and the ends curls under looks adorable. Think Lucy from the the first Narnia movie http://www.spareoom.net/gallery/?level=picture&id=219.

For women, try styles that start with at least some hair in hair ties as a base. If you do, the hair style will be much more stable because the pins will have something to grab. Your best option is going to be variations on the Civil War ball style https://rapunzelsresource.wordpress.com/2010/05/25/1860-ball-style/. You can start most of your actresses off with the first three steps and then braid one girl’s hair, twist another’s, etc. For an actress with very short hair, try the Gibson Roll https://rapunzelsresource.wordpress.com/2010/07/07/gibson-roll/, but skip the curls.

Any other tips for doing hair for a play?

Advertisements

Gibson Roll

Colossians 3:15-17

15And let the peace of God rule in your hearts,
to which also ye are called in one body, and be ye thankful.

16Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom,
teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs,
singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.

17And whatsoever ye do in word or deed,
do all in the name of the Lord Jesus,
giving thanks to God the Father by Him.

Today’s tutorial is for the Gibson Roll. There’s a popular hair book out there that has this style called the Gibson Tuck. It’s very pretty and virtually impossible if your hair is longer than shoulder-length. But anything short hair can do, long hair can do better, right? 🙂 This is a very useful style to have in your arsenal. I love its Edwardian flair, perfect for Anne Shirley. The low profile is good for hats. In the past, I’ve dressed it up with flowers or sparkly pins for weddings, recitals, and other formal events.

But before we get to that, I have some news for you ladies. Some of you may have already heard about . . . him. You see, I’ve found someone. We met online in May, and I’d definitely say it was love at first sight. All of my family and friends from church, homeschool, and otherwise heartily approve. We’ve spending over 2 hours a day together, and it just keeps getting better and better. He is the answer to my heart’s duet.

His name is Schroeder. Continue reading

1860s Ball Style

Psalm 100:3

3Know ye that the LORD, He is God; it is He that hath made us, and not we ourselves.
We are His people, and the sheep of His pasture.

Galatians 3:3

3Are ye so foolish? Having begun in the Spirit, are ye now made perfect by the flesh?

I’ve chosen two verses for today, and both speak about humility and tie into the verses in my previous post.  The verse in Psalms talks about how we came into this world.  There was nothing we could do about it; God chose to create us and give us our family.  Galatians 3 tells us that there was nothing we could do to earn Heaven; we can’t even do good works in our own strength.  God has given us our abilities and brings people into our lives.  Everything we are, have, or have done is by the grace (gift) of God.

*Drumroll, please!!* Today’s tutorial is for my humdinger, show-stopper, super-authentic, how-did-she-do-that 1860s ball style. This is for all my readers who re-enact the Victorian era, specifically the 1860s, and even more precisely the American Civil War. I’ve had this one in progress for forever, even before I started my blog (and pre-tripod and pre-paint). I use almost every technique I’ve shown you on this blog, but it’s actually pretty easy. I’ve included lots of links to the basic techniques. The pictures aren’t the greatest, but I hope the instructions make up for them. Enjoy! Continue reading

Sarah’s Request: Kate Beckinsale’s “Emma”

Hi everybody!

Today’s post is from a request from Sarah.

I wonder if you can figure out a way to do this style. I can only find one image of it, so it may be hard! I am filming a regency movie and am also the director, hair dresser, etc. So, I need some regency hair styles!! Can you help?? Thanks so much!

Here is the image.

Sarah was even so good as to reply to herself with a possible solution.  🙂

As I was thinking this over on my request. Do you think it would be possible to do this style like this:

Curl your hair, either in rollers or rags (for a curlier affect), or do pin curls. Then, do an upside down flip through, and maybe pin hair up slightly (so the hair falls down from a higher height on head.)

As I see it, there are about 3 different ways to do this style depending on how long your hair is.  All these start with pre-curled hair, so if you have naturally curly hair, you have it made in the shade!

Option 1. What Sarah came up with would work on shorter hair.  You could also do a regular flip through and then bobby pin the curls up. I’m pretty sure that is what is what the hairdresser for the movie did.

Option 2. Start with curly hair and make a faux-short ponytail.  I did that a while back for a different tutorial.  Here’s how it turned out.

Option 3. Start with curly hair again.  Make a bun and pin it so that the ends stick out the top and pin the curls over the bun. That would kind of look like the beginning of my Romola Garai Emma style.

I hope that helps!

I know it has been forever since I posted.  I’ll spare you the obligatory sob story, but real life has been very busy in both good and not-so-good ways.  Hopefully, things should get back to normal in a few weeks.

Emma: Romola Garai Version

Jeremiah 31:3

The LORD hath appeared of old unto me, saying,
“Yea, I have loved thee with an everlasting love;
therefore with lovingkindness have I drawn thee.”

In today’s tutorial, I am wearing a locket that my grandmother gave to me a few years before she passed away. The front is engraved with the words “I love you” and a rose, delicately colored. I wish I could get a picture of it to turn out! This verse is on the inside.

And now, drum roll, please!

The long-awaited Romola Garai “Emma” style! Continue reading

Bleak House: Version 2

Here’s “Bleak House” version 2. This style was inspired by the green dress style and some elements I liked from others so it’s not an exact copy. My other purpose was something for those of my readers who have straight hair. The current style for period drama hair seems to be very wavy/curly hair loosely looped back. If your hair doesn’t have much texture, there are some other ways to get a similar look. This also works great if you forgot to set your hair the night before. 😉 Continue reading

Bleak House: Version 1

Micah 6:6-8

6With what shall I come before the LORD, and bow myself before the high God?
Shall I come before Him with burnt offerings, with calves of a year old?
7Will the LORD be pleased with thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil?
Shall I give my firstborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?
8He hath shown thee, O man, what is good: and what doth the Lord require of thee
but to do justly and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?”

This passage asks how can we please God. First, Micah contemplates “reasonable” offerings, then unfathomable extremes of wealth. He even considers his child. Finally, he recognizes that anything we can do in the flesh is insufficient. The attitude of heart and fellowship with the Lord is what He desires.

Miss Nibs over at wickfield-writings.blogspot.com has asked me to a couple of styles from Bleak House. I haven’t seen the movie so please do some research before you decide if it would be appropriate viewing for your family. Today’s style is what most of the characters are wearing, from what I can tell. Continue reading